Percussion

Percussion

Can't you sit still with your hands and feet? Do you like tapping on everything? Then you are definitely someone who wants to play percussion or drums. You can play percussion on various instruments including drums, but also djembe, cajon, timpani, bongos, congas and other types of drums. You can also play melody percussion instruments such as the xylophone, vibraphone, glockenspiel or marimba. You will learn to play rhythms, read sheet music and play along with audio tracks. If you want to play percussion, you can learn to play many different instruments in various musical styles. So you don't always have to make music with the same instrument. In addition, you can participate in all kinds of different groups, bands and orchestras, because percussion is always needed. The percussion lessons basically include all percussion instruments, including snare drum, timpani, marimba, drum kit, concert bass drum, cymbals and effect instruments such as tambourine, triangle, shaker, castanets, but also bongos, congas, etc. You can also take lessons on djembe and cajon. . Especially for melodic percussion instruments such as marimba, xylophone and vibraphone, it is also important that you learn to read the pitches, just like with a wind instrument or piano. Each percussion instrument also has its own way of playing and choice of sticks. Holding the sticks for the different percussion instruments is sometimes slightly different to be able to play the instrument well. On YouTube or TV you see orchestras that include a drummer and a percussionist who plays many different instruments. That's the fun thing about playing percussion. You don't always have to make music with the same instrument. You are very versatile. In addition, you can participate in all kinds of different groups, bands and orchestras, because percussion is always needed. The drum and percussion lessons currently take place in a drum room at Visseringweg 60 in Diemen-Zuid. Unfortunately, only drum lessons can currently be given there. But no percussion lessons. Music School Diemen is looking intensively for a location where we can give all percussion lessons, provide the pop school lessons and start up the percussion ensemble again. Does anyone know a suitable space in Diemen? Please contact our coordinator Rombout Stoffers via coordinator@muziekschooldiemen.nl

Percussion2024-05-23T10:32:51+00:00

Drums ( Cloned )

Can't you sit still with your hands and feet? Do you like tapping on everything? Then drumming is for you! When learning to play the drums, you use all limbs. So you have to learn to move your hands and feet separately or simultaneously at different times. This is built up slowly with exercises, during which you also immediately learn the musical notation used for drum notation. Students who want to learn drums immediately receive lessons on the drum set and apply the technique exercises on the drum set. Audio tracks are also used in the lessons to practice the rhythm exercises. The use of various fills with different rhythmic patterns is also slowly built up. The beginning exercises are based on pop rhythms. If you master these drum rhythms and fills better, you will also learn the blues, shuffle, jazz, funk, etc. This way you learn to play different styles of drums and you can develop your own preferences. The drum and percussion lessons currently take place in a drum room at Visseringweg 60 in Diemen-Zuid. Unfortunately, only drum lessons can currently be given there. But no percussion lessons. Music School Diemen is looking intensively for a location where we can give all percussion lessons, provide the pop school lessons and start up the percussion ensemble again. Does anyone know a suitable space in Diemen? Please contact our coordinator Rombout Stoffers via coordinator@muziekschooldiemen.nl  

Drums ( Cloned )2024-05-23T09:24:13+00:00

Singing

The voice is a special instrument, unlike all other instruments, the voice has been in use for a lifetime. The way one speaks and sings and the shape of the inside of the face in which the voice resonates and is amplified, together with the length of the vocal cords, determine the possibilities and character of a voice. Every voice sound is therefore unique! The singing lesson consists of 2 parts. In the first half, we work on singing technique through exercises. This includes, among other things: breathing technique, good diction, expanding the vocal range, volume, and developing the timbre of the voice. If the student cannot read music, attention is also paid to this aspect. In the second half of the lesson we work on a piece of music, which can be classical, pop, musical and to a limited extent jazz. The repertoire is chosen in consultation: your own preference for a particular style or piece is important. When working on a piece of music, the central focus is on conveying the composition as musically as possible. Work is also being done on interpretation of the text and presentation. There are at least two presentation moments during a season.

Singing2024-05-23T09:14:33+00:00

Percussion Ensemble

The percussion ensemble was created because percussion and drum teacher Maarten Rongen wanted to present all percussion students as one large group during his annual recital evening. Maarten finds playing together - in addition to the individual lessons - very important and wants the students to come into contact with other percussion instruments besides the drum and drum kit. Enthusiastic percussion students can participate in the percussion ensemble. Experienced percussionists who do not take percussion lessons at the Diemen Music School, but who do have sufficient knowledge and mastery of percussion instruments and notation, can also register for this ensemble at Music School Diemen The ensemble is led by percussion teacher and conductor Maarten Rongen. Because we are currently experiencing location problems for rehearsals, the ensemble's rehearsals are not taking place at the moment. We are working hard on a solution. If this situation improves, we will keep you informed. The costs for a year are 140 euros for students of the music school and 160 euros for non-students of the music school.

Percussion Ensemble2024-05-23T09:13:03+00:00

Keyboard

The term Keyboard typically refers to a keyboard instrument that not only produces various sounds but also includes an accompaniment system on board that is controlled via chords. These ‘arranger keyboards’ provide the possibility of using automatic accompaniment in various styles and genres. Essentially, the ‘arranger keyboard’ is the successor to the earlier home organ. Another branch within the family is the synthesizer. Compared to arranger keyboards, synthesizers are more advanced when it comes to creating and manipulating sounds. On the other hand, they often lack automatic accompaniment and sound amplification. As a result, synthesizers are primarily used for composing or playing in a band. Nowadays, synthesizers exist in both hardware and software forms. Yet another category is the MIDI keyboard or master keyboard. In its pure form, a master keyboard does not produce any sounds. It can be connected to a sound module or computer via a MIDI connection or USB port. This allows the sounds of the instrument or computer it is connected to (referred to as the ‘slave’ at that moment) to be controlled. The master keyboard thus functions as a type of MIDI controller. An arranger keyboard or synthesizer can also serve as a master keyboard, provided it has a MIDI connection.

Keyboard2024-05-21T14:16:13+00:00

Flute

The flute, as the name suggests, is played by blowing across the lips; the airflow from the mouth is perpendicular to the instrument’s bore. The smaller and higher-pitched version is called the piccolo, while larger versions include the alto flute and bass flute. The modern flute, typically made of metal nowadays, was developed by Theobald Böhm from the traverso (baroque flute), which was usually made of wood (see details below under ‘history’). A flute consists of a narrow, straight tube with three main parts: the headjoint with a lip plate, the middle section with keys that can be operated by the fingers, and the footjoint (an optional addition) for playing even lower notes. When playing, the flute is held horizontally to the right. Its tonal range (ambitus) spans more than 3 octaves. The flute’s sound is produced by air splitting. The airstream is split by the edge of the embouchure hole in the headjoint. Tuning the instrument is achieved by pushing in or pulling out the headjoint. Shortening the flute produces higher pitches, while extending it lowers the pitch. Adjusting lip tension also allows for slight changes in tone. To achieve a beautiful tone, players should keep their teeth apart, cover no more than two-thirds of the embouchure hole, and maintain an upright posture. Although flutes are typically made of metal, they are classified as woodwind instruments rather than brass instruments. The distinction lies in how the sound is produced, not the material of the instrument

Flute2024-05-21T14:11:45+00:00

Clarinet

The clarinet consists of a more or less cylindrical hollow tube with holes, some of which are covered by the fingers, and others with a key. The holes covered by the fingers often have a ring (called a “bril”), which operates keys that cover holes lying beyond the reach of the fingers. Additionally, the clarinet has separate keys, including those operated by the pinky finger, which open or close other holes. All the holes are located on the front side of the clarinet, except for the thumb hole, which is situated at the back. The left hand’s thumb operates both the thumb hole and a separate key called the “duodecime key,” used for higher tones. The instrument’s end tapers into a funnel-shaped bell, which is called the “sound chamber.” This design ensures that the acoustic impedance of the tube is better matched to that of the air, resulting in increased sound production, especially in the lower tones. Clarinets are typically made from wood (especially grenadilla wood), but other materials such as metal and, more recently, plastic are also used. The actual sound production occurs at the mouthpiece. The clarinetist places their upper teeth on the mouthpiece and holds the lower lip against the reed, which is bound or clamped to the mouthpiece using a ligature. By blowing air between the mouthpiece and the reed, the reed begins to vibrate. The lip tension (embouchure) determines how much freedom the reed has to vibrate, affecting pitch and timbre. The reed’s vibration sets the air inside the clarinet in motion, creating sound. The hardness of the reed also plays a crucial role in the clarinet’s tone. A harder reed produces a warmer sound, but it can be more challenging for beginners to play. The reeds have a limited lifespan and need to be replaced regularly. The hardness of a reed is indicated by a number, ranging from 1 (softest) to 5 (hardest). The intermediate size, 2½, is often used by beginners. The acoustic impedance of the tube after the reed determines the possible pitches that can be produced. A cylindrical tube closed at one end produces a harmonic series with exclusively odd harmonics. As a result, a clarinet transitions to the twelfth (duodecime) instead of the octave, unlike most other wind instruments. A modern clarinet consists of 5 separate parts. In addition to the mouthpiece at the top and the bell at the bottom, there’s a piece called the “barrel” directly below the mouthpiece. The barrel’s inner diameter gradually increases from small to large. The middle section, which contains all the keys and holes, can also be split into two parts, making it easy to disassemble and transport the clarinet. The parts fit together airtight using cork seals.

Clarinet2024-05-21T14:10:03+00:00

Tuba/French Horn

The tuba is the name for several brass wind instruments in the bass register. Instruments classified under the tuba family include the euphonium (sometimes called a tenor tuba) and the (bass) tubas (tuned in F, E♭, C, or B♭). In many languages, ‘tuba’ generally refers to a bass tuba when unspecified. However, in amateur brass bands in the Netherlands and Belgium, it’s common to use the term ‘tuba’ to refer to a euphonium.

Tuba/French Horn2024-05-21T14:05:53+00:00

String Ensemble

Discover the Harmony of Strings with the String Ensemble, a vibrant community of music enthusiasts brought to life in 2020 by the talented violinist and teacher, Gabrielle Butler. Our ensemble is a tapestry of violin and cello students from the Diemen music school and beyond, embracing a wide age range of 4 to 60 years. At this ensemble, we celebrate the joy of music-making. It’s not just about playing; it’s a journey of collaborative learning, mastering the art of playing by heart, and exploring a diverse array of musical genres suitable for all skill levels. Our ensemble shines during our annual Christmas and grand finale concerts, where the magic of our collective performance captivates all. Joining the Ensemble Enrollment is a harmonious process, coordinated with our dedicated teacher. Rehearsal Rhythms We convene weekly on Fridays in the serene setting of room 2.1 at the Omval. For music school students, the annual fee is a modest 140 euros, while non-students contribute 160 euros. Junior String Ensemble In tune with our commitment to nurture the youngest. Don’t miss the chance to be part of this new melody—register your interest today!

String Ensemble2024-05-20T12:26:12+00:00

piano

The piano: A symphony of versatility! It’s the Swiss Army knife of instruments, fitting into nearly every music genre with ease, be it a soulful solo or as the backbone of accompaniment. From grand to upright, from acoustic to electric, the piano’s forms are as diverse as its history. It’s the modern descendant of the fortepiano, the very instrument that Mozart used to weave his keyboard magic. Lessons are a canvas, painted with the student’s abilities and passions. My repertoire is a treasure trove of tunes from all walks of music—classical, pop, jazz, musicals, ragtime, and even the art of improvisation.

piano2024-05-17T14:04:47+00:00
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